Data Obfuscation for Resistance and Protest

Ubiquitous collection and analysis of data has dramatically reshaped the nature of contemporary surveillance. Refusal is not an option as data exchange is an inherent condition of many essential, yet fundamentally asymmetric interactions with government as well as private, commercial actors. Obfuscation — the production of misleading, false, or ambiguous data — offers one vector…

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun | Habitual New Media

New media—we are told—exist at the bleeding edge of obsolescence. We thus forever try to catch up, updating to remain the same. Meanwhile, analytic, creative, and commercial efforts focus exclusively on the next big thing: figuring out what will spread and who will spread it the fastest. In Habitual New Media,Wendy Hui Kyong Chun argues that our media matter…

Wadie Said | Crimes of Terror: The Legal and Political Implications of Federal Terrorism Prosecutions

The U.S. government’s power to categorize individuals as terrorist suspects and therefore ineligible for certain long-standing constitutional protections has expanded exponentially since 9/11, all the while remaining resistant to oversight. Crimes of Terror: The Legal and Political Implications of Federal Terrorism Prosecutions provides a comprehensive and uniquely up-to-date dissection of the government’s advantages over suspects…

Guobin Yang | Regulating the Chinese Internet in the Name of Civility

Censorship in the name of civility or civilization is a common practice in the history of media and speech expression. Why the language of civility has become especially prevalent in Chinese official discourse about the internet in recent years, however, invites scrutiny. In appearance, this discourse of civility is used to curb allegedly uncivil online behavior….

Jacob Appelbaum | Underscan, the Culture of Keeping Tabs

Jacob Appelbaum, Journalist and Hacker  Tuesday, October 13, 2015 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM University of California, Davis School of Law, King Hall Rm 1001 Jacob Appelbaum is an independent computer security researcher and hacker. He was employed by the University of Washington, and is a core member of the Tor project, a free software…

Jennifer Lynch | Preserving Democracy in a 24/7 Surveillance Society

The Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution protects us from “unreasonable searches and seizures.” But what does that mean in a world where the government can use simple, widely-available, and often secret surveillance tools to figure out where we’ve been, where we’re going, who we associate with, and ultimately who we are—all without a…

Peter Galison | Cultures of Collection and the State of Secrecy

In this lecture, Peter Galison will contrast two moments in the long history of surveillance―two moments that have and are reshaping the self. The first, set in 1915, is about the Freudian self and its emergence in the midst of the massive press and postal censorship of World War I. The aim is to offer…

Cyrus Farivar | We’re All Being Watched: Local Surveillance

For the last decade, Farivar has lived in Oakland, California. And since that time, surveillance technology has gotten more widespread and invasive. The city’s license plate readers now exist on 33 different OPD vehicles, capturing the date, time and GPS location of every vehicle seen. Through the public records process, Farivar received over 4 million…

Vito Acconci | Everything I Know Will Be Yours: Surveillance In Plein Air

Vito Acconci Artist, Architect, Designer, Professor Pratt Institute, NY September 28, 2015 UC Berkeley  The influential, provocative and often radical art-making practices of Vito Acconci have earned him international recognition. Acconci has been a vital presence in contemporary art since the late 1960s; his confrontational and ultimately political works have evolved from writing through conceptual…

Phillip Rogaway | Why Most Cryptographers Don’t Care About Mass-Surveillance

Rogaway’s lecture will weave together some history, examples, and thoughts that might help to explain how the character of academic cryptography got to be the way that it is — intellectually flourishing, yet routinely disconnected from real-world needs. Rogaway will explore why the cryptographic community has been so unresponsive to revelations of mass surveillance. Phillip Rogaway Professor…

Jim Dempsey | National Security, Surveillance and Privacy

Eighteen months ago, the leaks of highly classified material by Edward Snowden began, followed by a flood of official disclosures.  Our nation and the world gained unprecedented insight into the workings of the National Security Agency and its British counterpart. Broad and deeply intrusive programs of electronic surveillance were publicly exposed.  What really have we…